DOCTORS AND NUTRITION

Doctors & Nutrition

Dr. Philip Binzel in Alive and Well asks:

Is there any hope that nutritional therapy will ever be accepted by the
medical profession? In my opinion, it is not a matter of “if”, it is only a
matter of “when.” As a patient of mine said to me several years ago,
“If doctors in this country don’t start going to nutrition, the patients are
going to stop going to the doctors.” The use of nutrition in the
prevention and treatment of disease will come from the ground up,
not from the top down. People are getting more nutritionally oriented
and are going to insist that their doctors do the same.

In regard to the treatment of cancer with nutritional therapy, before
this comes about, two things are going to have to happen:

  1. The medical profession is going to have to realize that they have
    been treating the wrong thing. They are going to have to realize that,
    as long as they continue to treat just the tumor alone, they are going
    to continue to get the same poor results that they have always had.
  2. The medical profession is going to have to accept the fact that the
    quality and quantity of life for the cancer patient obtained through
    nutritional therapy is far superior to anything available through our
    present modalities. In simpler terms, these people on nutritional
    therapy feel better and live longer.

I, most certainly, do not want to leave the impression that everything
about nutrition that can be known is now known. The very opposite is
true. We have only just begun to scratch the surface of our
understanding of the relationship between nutrition and disease. It is
my opinion that we must first understand the defense mechanisms of

the body. Why do these defense mechanisms respond so rapidly in
some situations and so slowly in others? What systems of the body
are involved in the defense mechanisms? In what order do they
respond? Once we have the answer to these questions we can then
determine what nutritional ingredients are necessary to keep those
systems of the body functioning normally.

The fact that we do not have the answers to the above-stated
questions does not mean, however, that we should not use the
information that we do have to its fullest extent. The pure medical
scientist will not use any form of treatment until he fully understands
why it works and how it works. The good practitioner, on the other
hand, will use any form of treatment that works, even if he does not
understand exactly why and how it works.

There are many examples of good practitioners in the annals of
medical history. Dr. Semmelweis, in 1860, insisted that all doctors
wash their hands before delivering a baby because, by so doing, it
eliminated “child bed fever.” He knew it worked, but he did not know
why or how it worked. He was removed from the hospital staff and
ostracized by the medical community. It was not until about the time
that Dr. Semmelweis died in 1865 that Dr. Lister discovered bacteria.
Dr. Lister was able to prove that Dr. Semmelweis was right and why
he was right. I doubt that Dr. Fleming in 1925 knew why he could
cure pneumonia by giving his patients moldy bread. He knew it
worked, but he did not know why or how it worked. It wasn’t until
some time later that he discovered a fungus in moldy bread that could
kill certain bacteria. This fungus eventually became known as
penicillin. Dr. Fleming was ridiculed by the medical profession for his
work. It would be another fifteen years before penicillin came into
use. By then, thousands of patients had died from pneumonia.

So it is with nutritional therapy in the treatment of cancer. I hope in

this book that I have been able to present sufficient evidence to show
that it works, even though at this time we do not know exactly why
and how it works.

After all is said and done, the true measurement of a good physician
is not necessarily how much he knows. It is, instead, how willing he is
to search for, find and then use whatever forms of treatment, which in
his opinion, will give his patients the very best chance to remain…
ALIVE AND WELL.

AFTER SURGERY, CHEMOTHERAPY AND/OR RADIATION, WHAT NEXT?

Dr. Philip Binzel, in his book, Alive and Well (1994), states:

There is nothing in surgery that will prevent the spread of cancer. There is nothing in radiation that will prevent the  spread of the disease. There is nothing in chemotherapy that will prevent the spread of the disease. How do we know? Just look at the statistics! There is a statistic known as “survival time.” Survival time is defined as that interval of time between when the diagnosis of cancer is first made in a given patient and when that patient dies from his disease. In the past fifty years, tremendous progress has been made in the early diagnosis of cancer. In that period of time, tremendous progress had been made in the surgical ability to remove tumors. Tremendous progress has been made in the use of radiation and chemotherapy in their ability to shrink or destroy tumors. But, the survival time of the cancer patient today is no greater than it was fifty years ago. What does this mean? It obviously means that we are treating the wrong thing! We are treating the symptom — the tumor, and we are doing absolutely nothing to prevent the spread of the disease. The only thing known to mankind today that will prevent the spread of cancer within the body is for that body’s own defense mechanisms to once again function normally. That’s what nutritional therapy does. It treats the defense mechanism, not the tumor. (page 69)

I am not opposed to the use of radiation. I am not opposed to the use of chemotherapy. There are times when a small amount of radiation for a short period of time can relieve pain and/or be life-saving to a patient. There are times when a small amount of chemotherapy for a short period of time can do the same. It is not the use of these that I so vehemently oppose, it is their abuse. The theory used in this country is that, if a little does some good, a whole lot more will do a whole lot better. Patients are getting radiation and chemotherapy who do not need it. Those who do need it are often getting far more than they need, thereby doing them much more harm than good. (page 71)

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Frequently Asked Question 4

I have been on metabolic therapy for 4 weeks now. The lump seems to have gotten bigger with some swelling. Why is that?

Dr Kelley, in One Answer to Cancer, explains that as one goes on Metabolic Therapy, the malignant tumor masses often continue to grow temporarily (bold mine) before ones normal metabolic functions can take over.

Also, once started on Metabolic Therapy, the objective of which is to supply the body with adequate pancreatic enzymes to properly digest food and stop the disease process, some swelling can be expected once liquid debris is produced from the pancreatic enzymes’ digestion of the malignant tumor masses and cells. The swelling, frequently misinterpreted and often scaring the cancer victim, is actually temporary and subsides as the liquid debris is “gobbled up” by white blood cells and removed from the body by way of bile from the liver, which goes to the colon and out, as urine from the kidneys and out through the bladder, and by way of skin perspiration as well as hair and nail growth.

Along with temporary swelling, one other misinterpreted part of Metabolic Therapy is an increase in the number of white blood cells which is actually ‘considered to be a good sign’ as it indicates that the body’s defense system is effectively responding to facilitate proper disposal of liquid debris and toxins.

(One Answer to Cancer, pp. 20-21)

B17 poultice for malignant ulcers

It was Dr. Manuel Navarro who suggested pulped kamoteng kahoy for the malignant ulcers of my indigent patients.

My first poultice was crude and messy: grated kamoteng kahoy pulped with mortar and pestle, then applied directly on the breast ulcer. Though it worked, actually stopped the oozing on the first day, the problem was clearing off the previous application without abrading scabs that had formed. Continue reading