Nutritional Cancer Therapy

Here, Dr. Philip Binzel recounts the influence of G. Edward Griffins and the Committee for Freedom of Choice in California, his shift from the comfortable and safe practice of traditional Family Medicine to the unconventional Nutritional Cancer Therapy which consequently got him embroiled in the politics of cancer (Alive and Well, Chapter One:  Case Dismissed)

Chapter Two: The Nutrition Connection

So, how did a Family Physician from a small town in Ohio ever get involved in a conflict with the FDA in the first place? If you read the Preface, you already know the answer. It was the fault of Mr. G. Edward Griffin.

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The Case For Laetrile (Amygdalin/Vitamin B17)

In the Preface to his book Alive and Well (1994) Dr. Philip E. Binzel writes: “The facts in this book are true. The names are real (except where I say they are not). The dates may not be completely accurate, but they are as close as I can remember.”

Chapter One: Case Dismissed

It was early December, 1977. My office girl, Ruthie Coe, called me on my intercom to tell me that I had a phone call from a Mr. Robert Bradford in California. She wanted to know if I wanted to take the call now or to call him back. I had known Bob Bradford for about three years. He was the head of an organization known as The Committee for Freedom of Choice in Cancer Therapy. I had done several seminars on nutrition with him. I told Ruthie that I would take the call now.

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Update on BITTER APRICOT KERNELS and bitter almonds

Alexander Tessier’s comment that ‘true bitter almonds are very difficult to come by,’ is so true. I have yet to find bitter almonds locally. So far, all I’ve come across are apricot kernels. His comment that apricot kernels are often referred to as bitter almonds and how not all apricot kernels are bitter as they do come sweet, are all so true, too. (http:/ /apricot-kernels.blogspot.com.au/2010/11/apricot-kernels-which-should-be-used.html) Continue reading

Love your pet? Love yourself, too!

Things sure haven’t gotten any better. As a matter of fact, what G. Edward Griffin wrote some 39 years ago, way back in 1974, just seem to have gotten worse.

Measured in terms of taste, volume and variety, Americans eat very well, indeed. But expensive or tasty food is not necessarily good food. Most Americans assume that it makes little difference what they put into their stomachs as long as they are full. Magically, (they think) everything that goes in somehow will be converted into perfect health. They scoff at the thought of proper diet. Yet many of these same people are fastidious about what they feed their pedigreed dogs and cats or their registered cattle and horses. Continue reading

Kamoteng Kahoy Tea (2)

See my January 19, 2012 post Kamoteng Kahoy Tea must be FRESHLY prepared daily 

Because the diameter of the cassava root was only an approximate 3-4 cm, adding 1/2 inch daily of available cassava root left much to be desired in terms of trying to establish an empirical dose. With a 4 cm. diameter cassava root on hand, I figured that weighing a peeled 3 ½ inch length, using a diet scale, would give a consistent baseline to start with: the diet scale showed 125 gm. Continue reading